RSA Conference: Circus of Vendors

In past years I never attended the RSA conference; it always came across as too much of a vendor show to me. This year I didn’t think I would go, until rsnake convinced me otherwise. So I bought myself an Expo Only pass. I had a lot of fun, meeting old time buddies from Foundstone and Mandiant, a bunch of clients, and partners. But I had the most fun just watching the show on the Expo floor. Must have been 300 booths and a gazillion sales people swarming them with those annoying mics trying to outspeak each other like barkers outside a souvenir store at a tourist destination. Companies doing raffles at their booths – I’ve seen that, but arcade car racing games like those at Dave & Busters, security “Jeopardy” shows every hour being hosted by “slick” sales people, cheesy whack-a-fraudster, wannabe Houdinis showing off card tricks and free beer made the cut too. I wondered, do clients actually walk the floor to learn about new products? I think not. They do so for the free entertainment, adulation, and giveaways.  Makes one wonder, are the RSA booths worth their price tag? The smallest, and furthest ones, which you would see if you were really looking for, are worth an arm and leg. VC money well spent? Oh what a circus it was!

– Rohyt

SCADA hacking? What if they used cofense.wpengine.com?

At this year’s RSA conference Ira Winkler went on to tell the audience about hacking into an energy company (via an authorized penetration test) using a targeted phishing email. Details are in this networkwold article: http://www.networkworld.com/news/2008/040908-rsa-hack-power-grid.html

“The penetration team started by tapping into distribution lists for SCADA user groups, where they harvested the e-mail addresses of people who worked for the target power company. They sent the workers an e-mail about a plan to cut their benefits and included a link to a Web site where they could find out more.”

Are we surprised they were successful? Absolutely not. We’ve been using this technique and responding to real incidents that that used spear phishing for quite some time now. But what if those same employees had already been “phished” through targeted awareness and then presented with the appropriate training material? What if you ran this exercise against all your employees regularly?

Phishme.com already has pre-built scenarios to make this training quick and easy. It has many generic domain names to choose from or you can register your own look-a-like domain.

There is no sense in paying a pentest company high dollar consulting fees to find out if your employees are vulnerable to phishing. I’m about to save your company a boat load of money.

Dear Magic Eight ball, I don’t currently conduct phishing attacks against my own employees as a means to train them. Am I vulnerable to spear-phishing attacks?

Whitepaper: The State of Information Security 2008

I just got back from The Credit Union Information Security Professionals Association 3rd annual National event in Austin Texas where Rohyt and I were talking to the folks about www.PhishMe.com.
I have never attended a CUISPA event before and welcomed the opportunity. It was refreshing to see this industry work together. Credit unions don’t have the budgets larger institutions do and many of their technologists wear multiple hats. Security is a group effort. (as it should be)

Two major takeaways I had from the conference:

1.) Credit Union security professionals have a can-do attitude and value networking with their peers to solve their security woes
2.) Don’t show up to a Credit Union event dressed in New York-Financial attire (unless you enjoy looking like that creepy sales guy) 🙂

On the heels of the CUISPA event is a good white paper I saw on BankInfoSecurity.com titled The State of Information Security 2008 – Survey Executive Overview (Free signup)

Tom Field (Editorial Director) did a good job putting the overview together. The top security issues I heard the Credit Union folks discuss are the same ones captured in this survey. (It’s good to see that this paralleled what I saw in person at CUISPA … too often these days a whitepaper is just a synonym for marketing fluff.)

Of course the #3 issue “3) Training – Employees, Customers Need More.” grabs our attention as our https://cofense.com/ moves from beta and inches towards launch.
I’m beyond excited.
-higB

p.s. If you happen to attend my ShmooCon 2008 presentation please be kind with the Shmooballs.

Phishing with Encoded IP Addresses

I was adding a little special sauce to Phishme.com this past week and thought this might be fun to share. We have a few different ways a user can craft their phishing links. If he/she chooses the IP address option, then there is also the choice of encoding options. This lets you mask the IP address in an attempt to trick the user into thinking part of the sub directory is perhaps the host name. Or as in the case with my mom… she thinks it is just the phone number so the computer knows where to call. And it’s hard to blame her when you see a decimal encoded IP address.

http://2130706433/somecompany.com

The team over at Marshal has put together a good walk through of the encoding so you can follow along. If you would like to view the javascript, you can find it here. This may not work on all browsers, but it holds up pretty well on your corporate windows boxes with IE or Firefox. Want to test it out? Just put in an IP address below and click on the link it generates.

-b3nn