Breaking the Myths of Social Engineering

Last week, a Washington Post article by Robert O’Harrow offered an interesting look at the most common attack vector used by cybercriminals to penetrate enterprises today: spear phishing. While we applaud (loudly) the thrust of the article – that enterprises need to educate users on the dangers of spear phishing – there are some very real challenges in user education that the article does not address.

User Awareness: A Growing Concern Among Organizations

Phishing has always been a challenge for companies, but in recent months high profile breaches have cast a bright light on a more pressing aspect of the phishing threat – user awareness; or the lack there of! The reason phishing attacks are so effective is because most employees have a basic level of phishing awareness. Companies attending recent events such as Black Hat and SANSFIRE, reiterate a common theme; “we need more effective ways to increase our employees’ awareness to help minimize the success of phishing attacks.”

Once thought of as a threat that could be mitigated simply by an email filter solution, phishing (and now more importantly, spear phishing) has evolved to such a sophisticated level that technical controls are no longer effective in differentiating well-crafted and targeted emails from legitimate ones.  This leaves employees as the last line of defense which is highlighting the need for improved education. The challenge for many security IT professionals is that they have little time to develop programs that provide effective education and reduce the risk to their organization. While many companies indicate they have an awareness program, they also indicate that they lack consistency and content.  This awareness model does little to increasing their employees’ awareness or change their behavior.

Organizations with mature awareness programs attribute their success to a mix of periodic communications and structured training that provide immediate, informative and relevant awareness content to employees. The inline awareness saves both time and resources and targets training to those who need it most. At PhishMe we encourage our customers to conduct sanctioned simulated phishing exercises. This allows organizations to identify where targeted education should be directed and offers the ability to provide immediate education.

There are several different ways PhishMe works with our clients to improve overall employee awareness including online games, tutorials, custom training and awareness program consultation.  In the end it comes down to striking the right balance between content and repetition for your enterprise.  Having trained over 2 million users to date our customers have seen how consistent training can raise awareness and reduce the risk of employees falling victim to phishing attacks by up to 80 percent.

If we are in your area, we welcome you to come speak with us at an upcoming event!

 

The PhishMe Team

 

RSA breach: Lessons Learnt

Most of you have probably heard about the “RSA hack” by now. It was hot news three weeks ago when an employee at RSA fell prey to a targeted phishing attack as explained in this blog post: http://blogs.rsa.com/rivner/anatomy-of-an-attack/ . A couple of issues highlighted in this article really caught my attention.

The article states – “These companies deploy any imaginable combination of state-of-the-art perimeter and end-point security controls, and use all imaginable combinations of security operations and security controls. Yet still the determined attackers find their way in. What does that tell you?“.  That tells me that technology by-itself is not the answer to combating spear phishing attacks, it’s also about training the end user to get better at how to be suspicious. Don’t get me wrong, I don’t think education is a silver bullet, but it’s more effective than filters and shiny, blinking boxes.  I like technologies that give the human another piece of trusted information they can use to evaluate the authenticity of an email. One example is Iconix’s SP Guard. We trained over 1.5 million (using PhishMe). The results show that perioidic training that immersed the subjects in the concept through mock phishing  was successful in bringing down susceptibility rates in excess of 60% on average within a few months.

The article aslo discussed how the attackers targeted employees that ” you wouldn’t consider…particularly high profile or high value targets.” There’s a lesson here; security awareness programs should not focus only on executives and systems administrators, but on the entire organization. “Low profile” employees can severely undermine the organization’s assets too, just through a couple of clicks.

Oh yes, and finally, the phishing email was caught by the email client’s junk filter; the victim went out of their way to retrieve the email into the inbox and act on it.

IMHO, end-point security technologies are to phishing attacks (or *APTs) what radars are to a stealth bomber.

Rohyt Belani

*APT term used facetiously 😉

Education vs. Technology

Trusteer recently released a study containing the results of a spear phishing test against 100 LinkedIn users. Their findings had a 68% failure rate. While a 68% failure rate seems high, it is not an unusual number for a group that has received no prior education or training in how to spot phishing – or at least training that is meant to be effective. We know this based on having sent well over a million spear phishing emails to employees of corporations across multiple industry verticals. Trusteer, a company that specializes in the creation of information security software products, stated in this article that the only real solution is a technological one. We wholeheartedly disagree. These are numbers that we have seen time and again; Numbers that we consistently reduce through education via periodic training exercises that immerse the recipient in the experience.

There are many characteristics of this test done by Trusteer that would cause anyone with a basic understanding of testing methodologies and statistics to stand up and take notice. Firstly, the test was conducted with no real prior education to the users; this would make a good baseline, but only if you then provided training to the same users and ran the test again later to measure the difference the training made. Trusteer did not do this. In fact, Trusteer by their own admission hand-picked the recipients from a pool of friends and family. Their claims of vetting this list to ensure that it contained people who “it estimated to be fairly educated about security” must be taken at best with a grain of salt. Secondly, this test was conducted on a very small pool of people – we don’t believe the sample set is large enough or diverse enough to make a sweeping statement. While we can agree with their claims of Social Engineering making it “easy to drive corporate users to fake websites that could potentially download malware onto their computer”, it is the way they draw the conclusion, their methodology, and the claims that only a technological solution is the answer, that we take issue with.

Social engineering is a human issue that evolves around technical controls.  Convincing someone to click a link or download a piece of malware is just a twist on the same methods used by grifters and con men for hundreds of years. As long as someone is unaware, there will always be someone to take advantage of them.

It is time we face the simple truth –  there is no magic box that will solve spear phishing. We can’t continue to let the end-user believe that if something made it into their inbox, then it must be ok. We need to proactively teach people to be suspicious.

Mac McCrory

Rebirth

This is the official rebirth of our blog. For a while now, this blog lay dormant, while the team at PhishMe was anything but. Sales and Marketing has been trying to keep up with the interest while Dev, Operations, and support have consistently delivered the most cutting edge phishing awareness services on the market. It’s a pity the blog hasn’t kept up because we have a lot of interesting thoughts and statistics to share, better late than never. Stay tuned for the latest on phishing news, our lessons learnt from successfully training people to thwart targeted phishing, and anything else we feel like rambling about.

SCADA hacking? What if they used cofense.wpengine.com?

At this year’s RSA conference Ira Winkler went on to tell the audience about hacking into an energy company (via an authorized penetration test) using a targeted phishing email. Details are in this networkwold article: http://www.networkworld.com/news/2008/040908-rsa-hack-power-grid.html

“The penetration team started by tapping into distribution lists for SCADA user groups, where they harvested the e-mail addresses of people who worked for the target power company. They sent the workers an e-mail about a plan to cut their benefits and included a link to a Web site where they could find out more.”

Are we surprised they were successful? Absolutely not. We’ve been using this technique and responding to real incidents that that used spear phishing for quite some time now. But what if those same employees had already been “phished” through targeted awareness and then presented with the appropriate training material? What if you ran this exercise against all your employees regularly?

Phishme.com already has pre-built scenarios to make this training quick and easy. It has many generic domain names to choose from or you can register your own look-a-like domain.

There is no sense in paying a pentest company high dollar consulting fees to find out if your employees are vulnerable to phishing. I’m about to save your company a boat load of money.

Dear Magic Eight ball, I don’t currently conduct phishing attacks against my own employees as a means to train them. Am I vulnerable to spear-phishing attacks?

Whitepaper: The State of Information Security 2008

I just got back from The Credit Union Information Security Professionals Association 3rd annual National event in Austin Texas where Rohyt and I were talking to the folks about www.PhishMe.com.
I have never attended a CUISPA event before and welcomed the opportunity. It was refreshing to see this industry work together. Credit unions don’t have the budgets larger institutions do and many of their technologists wear multiple hats. Security is a group effort. (as it should be)

Two major takeaways I had from the conference:

1.) Credit Union security professionals have a can-do attitude and value networking with their peers to solve their security woes
2.) Don’t show up to a Credit Union event dressed in New York-Financial attire (unless you enjoy looking like that creepy sales guy) 🙂

On the heels of the CUISPA event is a good white paper I saw on BankInfoSecurity.com titled The State of Information Security 2008 – Survey Executive Overview (Free signup)

Tom Field (Editorial Director) did a good job putting the overview together. The top security issues I heard the Credit Union folks discuss are the same ones captured in this survey. (It’s good to see that this paralleled what I saw in person at CUISPA … too often these days a whitepaper is just a synonym for marketing fluff.)

Of course the #3 issue “3) Training – Employees, Customers Need More.” grabs our attention as our https://cofense.com/ moves from beta and inches towards launch.
I’m beyond excited.
-higB

p.s. If you happen to attend my ShmooCon 2008 presentation please be kind with the Shmooballs.

If I was a hacker…err cracker…

  1. I would be very busy the week of Christmas, while IT security staff is probably operating at 20% normal strength. Not only is it the weakness in numbers, but also the holiday mood.  How many of you are actually working full days? IDS logs – thats probably the last thing on your mind now that you have Guitar Hero III in the breakroom.
  2. I would get busy if I heard that a company was being acquired. From my experience, most companies put a freeze on all discretionary spending from the time a deal is announced untill it closes. Unfortunately, security is often thrown into that discretionary spending budget, making it easy on the bad guys for several months!
  3. If I really wanted to spend Christmas with my family, I would just come back another time and phish employees…that works irrespective of season.

Wishing you all a very Happy New Year! Stay safe.

-Rohyt

Phishing for User Awareness

A recent survey of over 279 IT Executives indicated that the greatest security challenge they faced was building an effective security awareness program and encouraging their employees to embrace it.  Employees, albeit unaware, oblivious or unconcerned, continue to fall prey to conniving social engineers compromising sensitive data protected by millions of dollars worth of technology. The return on investment on building user awareness is apparent and no longer a hard sell for IT security staff. The real problem lies in building an effective program that actually changes the mindset of the employees.  In a society where 90% of recovering coronary bypass patients do not change their dietary and lifestyle habits, will an awareness program really change their attitude towards information security?

This year we conducted numerous social engineering exercises for Fortune 500 companies, whose success relies heavily on the protection of intellectual property. These exercises involved scripted telephone calls to the organization’s customer service departments and mass phishing emails targeting a randomly selected set of employees. The objective was to collect sensitive data; the results were astounding. At one organization, 627 of the 1000 people targeted by phishing emails (aimed at pilfering the employees’ corporate VPN credentials) succumbed to the attack and only 4 of the 373 that did not respond reported the issue to information security staff. It’s not so much those statistics that made the results astounding, but the fact that the organization had recently conducted user awareness workshops that addressed the threats posed by social engineers. So where did they go wrong? Are the information security personnel to blame for developing ineffective programs or the employees for their lack of following direction? I believe it’s a combination of both; but the information security staff must assume the onus of taking the initiative of developing innovative user awareness programs that make a lasting impression. The majority of the security awareness sessions I’ve attended whave been unstimulating affairs couching the do’s and don’ts of security. Another approach used involves mandatory computer based training (CBT) programs for employees.  At the end of the CBT session the employees had only improved their mouse-click speed. On the other hand, an approach I’ve found to be very successful entails sending out email to all employees (or to a representative sample of them) that mimics a true phishing attack aimed at garnering personal information. If the employees yield, they are immediately presented an informative message explaining the attack and redirected to the corporate awareness materials. This approach has proven to be very effective as the people who are most vulnerable are educated right away, and the next time a real phishing attack comes through, the emulation exercise will probably be the first thing that comes to the employee’s mind. One of our clients experienced a drop in the “hit rate” for such attacks from 67% to 4% over the course of three such phishing exercises!

-Rohyt