Re: The Zombie Phish

By: Lucas Ashbaugh, Nick Guarino, Max Gannon

Out of nowhere, someone responds to an email conversation that wrapped up months ago. It’s a real conversation that actually happened. Maybe it’s about a meeting, a job opportunity, or a reply to that problem you had over a year ago; this email is highly relevant to you. But something is off, the topic of the email is months out of date and now there is a weird error message.

This is a devious tactic, reviving an email conversation long dead – it’s the Zombie Phish.

Not Your Average Phish
The Cofense™ Phishing Defense Center (PDC) has recently been defending against an extensive Zombie Phishing campaign against multiple clients. Fraudsters hijack a compromised email account, and using that account’s inbox, reply to long dead conversations with a phishing link or malicious attachment. Due to the subject of the email being directly relevant to the victim, a curious click is highly likely to occur.

These Zombie Phish appear to use automatically generated infection URLs to evade detection. No two links are the same. These links are hidden behind unassuming “error” messages in the body of the email, providing an appealing scheme for users to fall victim to. Thus far, the PDC has observed two common Zombie Phishing templates that lead to malicious links. These email campaigns can be seen in Figures 1 and 2.

Figure 1

Figure 2

Another common hallmark of this campaign is the use of the .icu top-level domain (TLD), however this could change in the future. Example domains identified during this campaign, which abuse the .icu TLD, can be seen in Figure 3.

Figure 3 shows .icu domains associated with these campaigns.

Already, many of these domains have been shut down by their domain registrar after receiving reports of domain abuse. Figure 4 shows a domain associated with this campaign and the data that is collected and displayed by the registrar.

Figure 4, Courtesy of http://whois.domaintools.com

Additionally, the PDC has observed these phish using official organizational logos to add legitimacy to fake login pages – an example of such can be seen in figure 5. The pages are designed to impersonate an online portal of the target, including the company’s logo, and even its favicon. The end goal is credential theft of the victim.

Figure 5

Finally, any victim that visits the malicious website is “fingerprinted” using the host’s IP address as an identifier and upon entering credentials is immediately redirected to the same spam website seen by other victims. This is often via links obfuscated using URL shorteners (such as hxxps://href[.]li/). If the same host attempts to visit the phishing link again the spoofed login page is skipped and instead you are forwarded directly to the spam page. This finger-printing and the URL shortener obfuscation helps the attackers keep a low profile and continue their campaign unabated.

Conversation Hijacking
The tactic of “conversation hijacking” itself is by no means new, fraudsters have been hijacking compromised email accounts to dish out malware and phish as replies to prior conversations for years now. This technique is still popular because it makes victims much more likely to click on links and download or open files because their guard is down when these are within conversations already in their inbox. An ongoing and currently in the wild example of this is the Geodo botnet which has a history of inserting itself into existing email threads to deliver malicious documents that in turn download a sample of Geodo or other malware like Ursnif. However, the effectiveness of this tactic can depend greatly on the content of the conversations, a response to an automated advertising email is less likely to result in an infection than a response to a help desk support thread such as the one seen in Figure 6. Cofense IntelligenceTM has seen several Geodo campaigns consisting of responses to automated advertising emails indicating that, in some cases, the campaigns consist of indiscriminate responses to all emails in an inbox. Given that the volume of these “conversation hijacking” campaigns is still comparatively low, the smaller scope of these emails is likely limited by the number of ongoing conversations. Certain types of accounts therefore are more likely to draw threat actors direct attention and to induce them to invest additional effort and time into developing unique phishing campaigns for those accounts.

Preventing Your Personal Zombie Apocalypse
The PDC has compiled these quick tips to avoid losing your credentials (or your brains) to a Zombie Phish:

  • Be alert for email subjects that may appear relevant but are from old conversations.
  • Watch out for the hallmark green “error” button (pictured above in figure 1).
  • Don’t trust attached documents simply because they are replying to a conversation.
  • Mouse over buttons or links in suspicious messages to check them for the “.icu” top-level domain.

Cofense’s Phishing Defense CenterTM has observed that these campaigns have become increasingly clever, to combat this, training employees to be able to spot these types of emails is key. You can put down your nail-bats and pitchforks – a properly trained workforce is what is needed to defend your organization against the Zombie Phish hordes.

Cofense offers comprehensive phishing training to arm your employees with the weapons they need to protect your organization. And if you need reinforcements to help against the hordes, the Cofense Phishing Defense Center is happy to do battle with you.

All third-party trademarks referenced by Cofense whether in logo form, name form or product form, or otherwise, remain the property of their respective holders, and use of these trademarks in no way indicates any relationship between Cofense and the holders of the trademarks.

Indicators of Compromise:

Observed Domains
message-akbq[.]cdnmsgload[.]icu

id-Wdtd[.]cdnmsgload[.]icu

message-XPsO[.]cdnmsgload[.]icu

www-jaus[.]check256ssl[.]icu

www-gcgc[.]emailmobile[.]icu

www-wNZq[.]emailmobile[.]icu

message-ncvm[.]emailmobile[.]icu

message-fbfa[.]extmailread[.]icu

www-gwXs[.]fetchemailgo[.]icu

message-jkgj[.]fetchemailgo[.]icu

www-udzi[.]fetchemailgo[.]icu

www-DQcE[.]inboxloaderror[.]icu

message-rpaK[.]inboxloaderror[.]icu

id-jPXC[.]iosemail[.]icu

id-oexq[.]iosemail[.]icu

www-BEOb[.]iosemail[.]icu

id-hKHR[.]iosemail[.]icu

message-EQdH[.]loadcdnmsg[.]icu

www-IqMJ[.]loadcdnmsg[.]icu

message-kqif[.]loading8[.]icu

message-pzvv[.]loading8[.]icu

www-qtnt[.]loading8[.]icu

id-pjgx[.]loading8[.]icu

www-ZMZs[.]loading8[.]icu

www-YIjn[.]loading8[.]icu

message-spuj[.]mail-load[.]icu

www-stxs[.]msgmailweb[.]icu

message-cmmh[.]portalmail[.]icu

message-pcsf[.]secure2[.]icu

id-amjs[.]securemail1[.]icu

www-tesj[.]userclientmsg[.]icu

 

Observed IPs

198[.]46[.]131[.]54

192[.]3[.]202[.]53

“Brazilian Election” Themed Phish Target Users with South American-Targeted Malware, Astaroth Trojan

Threat actors attempted to leverage the current Brazilian presidential election to distribute the Astaroth WMIC Trojan to Brazilian victims. The emails had a subject line related to an alleged scandal involving Brazilian then-presidential candidate Jair Bolsonaro. Some campaigns impersonated a well-known Brazilian research and statistics company. Multiple delivery methods and geolocation techniques were used to target Brazilian users, who were encouraged to interact with the attached and downloaded archives containing .lnk files. These files downloaded the first stage of the Astaroth WMIC Trojan, previously spotted this year by the Cofense Phishing Defense Center and known to target South American users.

H-Worm and jRAT Malware: Two RATs are Better than One

When threat actors bundle two or more malware families in one campaign, they gain broader capabilities. Cofense Intelligence™ recently analyzed a phishing campaign delivering both jRAT and H-Worm remote access trojans. jRAT, aka the Java Remote Access Trojan, has the primary role of remotely controlling a victim’s machine. H-Worm, also known as Houdini Worm, operates as a remote access trojan but has worm-like capabilities, such as propagating itself on removable devices like a USB.

Using a generic phishing lure pertaining to an invoice, the email below contains two attached .zip archives: one with a VBScript application and the other a .jar Java application.

Figure 1: Phishing lure delivering jRAT and H-Worm

While the .jar file is a sample of jRAT, it also drops a copy of H-Worm on the infected machine. The VBScript file is tasked with downloading a Java Runtime Environment (JRE), if it is not already on the machine, which allows the .jar file to run. This VBScript file is a sample of H-Worm. The delivery is unusual compared to older analyses of H-Worm with jRAT, which typically consists of a single payload used to facilitate the infection of both H-Worm and jRAT (and sometimes H-Worm with other malware families).

Two RATs, One Infection

Disseminating two similarly functioning malware families in a single infection is not a new tactic. Threat actors do this to exfiltrate more valuable information and to carry out additional tasks that support further infection or monetization. Some of the functions and capabilities of H-Worm and jRAT are shown below.

Figure 2: Distinct functions and similarities of H-Worm and jRAT

Each remote access trojan serves a specific purpose, such as keylogging, monitoring audio or video, or modifying the registry. At the end of the day, the specific malware or number of malware families used in a single infection cycle does not matter to the threat actor as long as there is a better chance for a successful infection. In the end, all that matters to the threat actors is if they were able to exfiltrate the information they seek.

However, for many attackers, the outcome of a successful infection also relies upon the successful delivery of a phishing email. Threat actors will continue to develop new tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTPs) to lure their intended targets. The first step to avoid an infection like the one above is to recognize and report suspicious messages. Educating computer users to identify suspicious emails can help your organization stop an attack on your infrastructure.

Learn how Cofense PhishMeTM conditions users to recognize active phishing threats.

 

All third-party trademarks referenced by Cofense whether in logo form, name form or product form, or otherwise, remain the property of their respective holders, and use of these trademarks in no way indicates any relationship between Cofense and the holders of the trademarks.

 

America’s First: US Leads in Global Malware C2 Distribution

By Mollie MacDougall and Darrel Rendell

Cofense Intelligence™ has found that 27% of network Indicators of Compromise (IoC) from phishing-borne malware analysed during 2018 used C2 infrastructure located in, or proxied through, the United States—making the US the leader in global malware C2 distribution.

Map 1 details these observations. This does not indicate that US-based users are getting hit disproportionately, as threat actors are incentivised to host C2 infrastructure outside of their own country or countries with extradition agreements with their host nations to avoid arrest and/or extradition. However, C2 infrastructure is enormously biased toward compromised hosts, indicating a high prevalence of host compromises within the United States.

Map 1: All IPs, both resolved from domain and names and direct-connects, observed during 2018

Chart 1 reflects the top 5 data points observed in Map 1, calculated relative to one another.

Chart 1: Top 5 C2 location points across the globe, year-to-date 2018.

Maps 2 and 3 detail the juxtaposition in C2 locations between TrickBot and Geodo Tier 1 proxy nodes.

Map 2: TrickBot C2 distribution year-to-date 2018

Map 3: Geodo C2 distribution year-to-date 2018

At first glance, the contrast between Geodo and TrickBot may seem odd; Geodo overwhelmingly favors US hosts whereas TrickBot has a propensity toward Russian devices. However, Geodo uses networks of compromised web servers, running Nginx to serve as Tier 1 proxy nodes. More specifically, Geodo uses legitimate web servers as a reverse proxy, tunnelling traffic through these legitimate web servers to hosts on the true hidden C2 infrastructure. TrickBot, on the other hand, almost exclusively uses for-purpose Virtual Private Servers (VPSs) to host its nefarious infrastructure.

TrickBot’s C2 distribution trends significantly more eastward—with a greater number of C2 locations in Eastern Europe and Russia. TrickBot campaigns almost always target Western victims. In June, Cofense Intelligence released a report detailing sustained, pernicious attacks against UK targets. TrickBot’s targeting of Western victims from Eastern-hosted C2 could be due to the lack of extradition agreements amongst those countries (Figure 1). Still, TrickBot does rely on some C2 locations in North America and Western Europe. This could alternatively be a strategic move wherein TrickBot uses regionally diverse C2 locations to make it more difficult to profile its infrastructure, to introduce uncertainty and help keep the hosts viable for the longest possible time. Chart 2 is a companion of Map 2, detailing TrickBot’s favored demographics.

Figure 1: Countries with which the US has extradition agreements.1

Chart 2: A breakdown of TrickBot’s C2 locations. Note: In the ‘Other’ category, 64% are Eastern (including Eastern European).

Looking Ahead

The scattering of C2 locations for Geodo and TrickBot demonstrates the vast infrastructure of two of the most pernicious malware currently distributed via phishing. This suggests that these malware families will almost certainly remain on the scene in the months to come. An avid network defender should take note that using geolocation to help differentiate legitimate traffic from potentially malicious traffic may not be as effective as it seems. In light of the case study above, it would be prudent to actively monitor the threat landscape from a reliable source and stay vigilant.

To learn more about 2018 Geodo and TrickBot activity, view the Cofense™ analysis.

 

All third-party trademarks referenced by Cofense whether in logo form, name form or product form, or otherwise, remain the property of their respective holders, and use of these trademarks in no way indicates any relationship between Cofense and the holders of the trademarks.

1 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extradition_law_in_the_United_States

 

A Staggering Amount of Stolen Data is Heading to Zoho Domains

After last month’s brief domain suspension of Zoho—which resulted from an insufficient response to reported phishing abuse— Cofense Intelligence™ has uncovered Zoho’s connection to an extremely high number of keylogger phishing campaigns designed to harvest data from infected machines. Of all Keyloggers analysed by Cofense, 40% used a zoho.com or zoho.eu email address to exfiltrate data from victim machines.

Staying King Krab: GandCrab Malware Keeps a Step Ahead of Network Defenses

GandCrab ransomware is being rapidly developed to evade the cyber security community’s defense efforts, aid proliferation, and secure revenue for those driving the malware. Cofense Intelligence TM has identified a new campaign that is delivering GandCrab version 4.4, the newest iteration of this prolific ransomware. The developers of GandCrab are aware of the research analysis done on its past versions, and release new versions rapidly to negate the solutions. These malicious developers also release versions in direct correlation to specific security companies’ findings. In the last two months, the authors of GandCrab have released version 4, and subsequent 4.x releases to improve the ransomware’s capabilities.

The email-borne campaign bearing GandCrab v4.4 (analyzed by Cofense Intelligence) did not follow the usual trends of being delivered via Microsoft Office Macro attachment. The lures employed during these previous campaigns were typically enticing recipients to download an infected resume or subpoena. The emails were written in German and had an attached .zip archive that contained an executable sample of GandCrab v4.4. The email body follows previous campaign narratives and is depicted in Figures 1 & 2.

Figure 1: The email body written in German.

Figure 2: The email body translated to English.

Once executed, the GandCrab sample will then collect information about the machine and determine if it is a viable candidate for encryption. If the machine has been deemed acceptable, files that meet specific criteria are then encrypted. After encryption, GandCrab then drops the ransom note in each directory via a .txt file. Figure 3 is a ransom note example.

Figure 3: A GandCrab ransom note example.

The fourth version of GandCrab was released in July, only six months after the first sighting of GandCrab in the wild. This latest version is a drastic change from its predecessors. Focusing on speed of encryption, this version switches from using RSA-2048 to the Salsa20 encryption algorithm. Prior to the fourth version of GandCrab the sample would need to successfully check in with its Command and Control (C2) structure before beginning the encryption process. Figure 4 documents strings found in GandCrab. referencing the developer of the Salsa20 algorithm.

Figure 4: The creator of Salsa20 algorithm is shown in the memory strings.

Versions 4 and 4.1 saw the introduction of a mechanism designed to prevent GandCrab running on undesirable machines. These specific versions would create a hex string .lock file based on specific information being present on the machine and place it in the C:\ProgramData directory. The .lock file would be queried and, if it found the binary, would terminate itself without encrypting the endpoint. Another GandCrab kill-switch is triggered when the sample looks at the language packs installed on the machine. If GandCrab finds a Russian language pack or former Soviet Union language packs, it will terminate itself without encrypting the endpoint.

Another upgrade that came with versions 4 and 4.1 was the ability to encrypt file shares and attached devices. This is done through interaction with the System Volume Manager to detect these resources. This is a big update in weaponry because it gives this ransomware the ability to engulf a network with encrypted files. This version’s ability to encrypt file shares puts a greater emphasis on the mitigation and response techniques needed within a network. The encrypted files also get a new extension and are then appended with .KRAB, as well as the ransom notes being renamed to KRAB-DECRYPT.txt. Figure 5 shows the encrypted file system, as well as the ransom note placed on the Desktop.

Figure 5: The GandCrab ransom note placement and the .KRAB extensions.

GandCrab v4.1 had also shown new network traffic not previously seen with the older versions. This version will use a custom Domain Generation Algorithm (DGA) to create URLs and POST the information collected from the machine to the DGA created URL. These POSTs are not to a GandCrab C2 infrastructure, rather they are legitimate domains. However, some researchers have theorized that these POSTs might be the Proof-of-Concept (PoC) for a future feature yet to be fully utilized. Other researchers believe that these POSTs are meant to fill the network with false positive C2s. Figure 6 shows the multiple POSTs to DGA created URLs.

Figure 6: The network POSTs to the DGA created URLs.

Version 4.1.2 was created out of necessity because of the work done by AhnLab, Inc. and their vaccine software. AhnLab found that the .lock file could be impersonated and placed on the machine beforehand. By doing this, the GandCrab sample would find the .lock file and terminate itself, thus preventing it from successfully encrypting the machine. The vaccine provided by AhnLab was negated within four days by the ransomware developers by utilizing the Salsa20 encryption algorithm to create the .lock file. Less than one day later, AhnLab provided v2.0 of the vaccine. Two days later, a new variant of GandCrab was spotted which checked for a mutex instead. GandCrab v4.1.2 also added anti-sandbox techniques, such as checking the allocated memory and registry for indicators of a virtual environment.

The updated version 4.1.2 became the basis for v4.2+ and brought about a PoC weapon aimed at AhnLab. This PoC is source code that claims it can cause a Denial of Service (DoS) attack on the AhnLab anti-virus solution used on endpoints. The PoC claims that this can cause a Blue Screen of Death (BSOD) on the targeted system. GandCrab’s anti-sandbox techniques, as discussed above, were also removed in v4.2.1. Figure 7 shows the link to the PoC within the running memory.

Figure 7: The BSOD PoC link in the memory strings.

Version 4.3 was simply a re-compile and re-organization of the code as well as adding anti-disassembly techniques. Version 4.4, the latest version, was built upon previous versions with a few new features of its own. The latest version comes with a stealth mode which, when enabled, queries the information gathered. It then determines if any processes on the endpoint need to be terminated before GandCrab starts its infection. Most of the processes targeted for termination are anti-virus products and those which may hold handles to important files (such as database files) which GandCrab intends to encrypt. This allows for the sample to have a non-disruptive and stealth-like file encryption process. The latest version also comes with a self-kill switch. This version can create the .lock file and place it in the %ProgramData% directory before infection as a nod to AhnLab’s vaccine. If the .lock file is found, the sample then sleeps in the background indefinitely. Figure 8 shows the stealth mode strings in memory.

Figure 8: Stealth mode in the memory strings.

What You Can Do

As with any ransomware, especially GandCrab v4.4, you need to have the proper mitigation in place in case an endpoint on the network becomes encrypted. Proper mitigation involves having up-to-date software from the manufacturer; network segmentation from resources that are considered critical; re-occurring and tested backups of all business-critical data; an email security stack that can sanitize emails as they arrive to the end user; and a response plan that has been practiced and refined. Having these things in place can help you withstand a ransomware incident.

GandCrab blasted onto the scene in early 2018, and since then has made great strides in staying relevant in the shifting landscape. The latest rendition employs tactics, like offline encryption, that had not yet been seen by prior iterations. GandCrab v4 has been able to change and adapt to the mitigation tactics of the cyber security community within the span of two months. The developers of GandCrab have been able to quickly evolve their malware based on anti-virus research analysis, which allows for more effective and lasting infections for the ransomware operators. This rapid development cycle of ransomware is a new trend that could likely lead to more malware developers taking research analysis as constructive criticism, then making their samples more robust in the future.

To stay abreast of developments in malware and phishing attacks, sign up for free Cofense Threat Alerts.

 

All third-party trademarks referenced by Cofense whether in logo form, name form or product form, or otherwise, remain the property of their respective holders, and use of these trademarks in no way indicates any relationship between Cofense and the holders of the trademarks.

Summer Reruns: Threat Actors Are Sticking with Malware that Works

Let’s take a look back at this summer’s malware trends as observed by Cofense IntelligenceTM. Summer 2018 has been marked by extremely inconsistent delivery of TrickBot and Geodo, though volumes of lower-impact malware families like Pony and Loki Bot remained consistently high. What’s more, improvements to the delivery and behavior of Geodo and TrickBot accompanied the resurgence of two updated malware families—Hermes ransomware and AZORult stealer—in reaffirming a preference by threat actors to update previous tools instead of developing new malware.  Because threat actors will continue to improve their software to ensure a successful infection, it’s important to understand these potentially harmful attacks.

Recent Geodo Malware Campaigns Feature Heavily Obfuscated Macros

Part 3 of 3

As we mentioned in our previous overview of Geodo, the documents used to deliver Geodo are all quite similar. Each document comes weaponised with a hostile macro. The macros are always heavily obfuscated, with junk functions and string substitutions prevalent throughout the code. The obfuscation uses three languages or dialects as part of the obfuscation process: Visual Basic, PowerShell, and Batch.

Twin Trouble: Geodo Malware URL-Based Campaigns Use Two URL Classes

Part 2 of 3

As discussed in our prior blog post, URL-based campaigns – that is, campaigns that deliver messages which contain URLs to download weaponised Office documents – are by far the most prevalent payload mechanism employed by Geodo. Indeed, analysis of ~612K messages shows just 7300 have attachments; a trifling 1.2% of the total. The structure of the URLs falls into two distinct classes. Cofense Intelligence™ analysed a corpus of 90,000 URLs and identified 165 unique URL paths. There are two distinct classes of URLs employed by Geodo. A detailed breakdown of these URL structures follows.